Child & Youth Health
Food Substitutes for Anaphylactic Students

Food Substitutes for Anaphylactic Students

There are students in our schools, who have severe allergies to foods and other substances. At times, even exposure to a tiny amount of these foods or substances could be potentially serious and life-threatening. We can all play a positive role in preventing such a dangerous and frightening situation at our school. The specific students and their families are taking responsibility to avoid exposures. However, staff members, other students and their families can also help to make the school environment safer.

Below are some websites that can provide information on food substitutes for anaphylactic students. Feel free to speak to your school administration should you have any questions.

http://www.eatingwithfoodallergies ...
http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.o ...
http://www.superhealthykids.com
http://www.verywell.com
Coverage for student injuries that occur on school premises

Coverage for student injuries that occur on school premises

Please see attached flyer for more information.

It is time for the annual school helmet campaign!

It is time for the annual school helmet campaign!

The Hamilton Helmet Initiative (HHI) is committed to preventing brain injury in our community by supporting access to helmets and educational/skill building programming. Head injuries represent 20-40% of all bicycling injuries seen at Canadian emergency rooms. The brain is fragile and helmets work to protect the brain when you fall. The HWCDSB is supporting access to affordable helmets through the Canada Helmet Initiative (CHI) annual Spring Helmet Campaign. This campaign enables students, staff and families to purchase certified toddler, multi-sport, bicycle, hockey helmets at prices 50% below retail.

For every helmet sold, $1 will be donated to the HHI to provide FREE HELMETS within your City to students who may not be able to afford to purchase a helmet.

Students in grades K-8 can create a poster to enter in the Heads Up! 4 poster contest which closes February 24th, 2017.

For more information and tips on helmet safety, please see the

Need Help With Head Lice?

Need Help With Head Lice?

Now available for children and their families...
- Screening (head checks)
- Medicated products
- Information provided by a Public Health Nurse
- Time to talk to other parents
- Bus tickers
- Snack

Please see attached flyer for location details.

Avoid risk of suspension. Report your child’s vaccines to Public Health. Avoid risk of suspension. Report your child’s vaccines to Public Health.

Avoid risk of suspension. Report your child’s vaccines to Public Health.

Provide a copy of your child's yellow immunization card or a record from their doctor by:

Fax: 905-546-4841
Mail: City of Hamilton, Public Health Services, Vaccine Program, P.O. Box 897, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3P6
Phone: 905-540-5250 - have your child's vaccine dates and health card number ready

http://hamilton.ca/vaccines



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World Sickle Cell Disease Day

World Sickle Cell Disease Day

World health organization and the united nations has recognized June 19 as a day to promote awareness of sickle cell disease all over the world

Vaccine Program - The City of Hamilton

Vaccine Program - The City of Hamilton

The Vaccine Program aims to reduce the frequency, severity and impact of vaccine preventable diseases for Hamilton residents.

Vaccine Information can be found at http://www.hamilton.ca/immunize
Strategies developed from Skinner Inquest to prevent underage drinking

Strategies developed from Skinner Inquest to prevent underage drinking

On November 20th, Hamilton Public Health Services, Hamilton Police Service, the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board and the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board will hosted a free event to launch parent resources developed in response to recommendations from the inquest into the 2010 alcohol poisoning death of a local youth, Christopher Skinner.

"It's important to bring parents together and discuss how to prevent these tragedies from happening," said Hamilton Police Chief Glenn De Caire. The Strategies for Parents to Prevent Underage Drinking pamphlet and animated video provide some guidance for parents in an area where they often receive mixed messages.

“Parents play a significant role in decreasing risky behaviours among youth, including alcohol consumption”, says Patricia Amos, Director of Education at the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board.

According to John Malloy, Director of Education at Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board, “It’s important to educate parents about the harms associated with alcohol consumption and their role in influencing their teen’s alcohol use.”

This education piece is critical, explains Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, Medical Officer of Health at Hamilton Public Health Services, “Alcohol is particularly harmful to youth as their brains are still developing. Alcohol use can lead to memory loss, problems thinking and understanding, and can be linked to depression in youth.”


Eye See Eye Learn Program

Eye See Eye Learn Program

Together with the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board and other community partners, the Ontario Association of Optometrists is pleased to once again offer the Eye See…Eye Learn program to Hamilton Junior Kindergarten families.

The Eye See…Eye Learn program, open to all Hamilton-Wentworth Junior Kindergarten students, provides OHIP-insured eye exams by local participating optometrists and a free pair of brand new, high quality eyeglasses should they require them. The program is completely free for parents. The Eye See…Eye Learn program is intended to remove all vision barriers from children , provide proper eye care if prescribed, identify potential underlying health concerns and allow young learners to reach their full potential in school.

The Eye See…Eye Learn program was created to address the troubling Ontario statistics which show that only approximately 25 per cent of children between the ages of five and nine had been examined by an optometrist and, by contrast, only seven per cent of children five years of age and under were seen in this same time period. This is despite the fact that annual eye examinations are covered by OHIP for children 19 years of age and under.

"Too often children don't complain to their parents about not seeing well because they don't know what normal vision is supposed to look like," says Dr. Sheldon Salaba, a local optometrist and Chair of the Eye See…Eye Learn program. "Children can be labelled as having behavioural or learning disabilities because they are unable to see or focus on the work when all they require is a pair of eyeglasses. An eye exam can give parents the piece of mind of knowing whether their child can see well or not."

Morris Hucal, HWCDSB Assistant Superintendent, agrees. "We recognize the important link between eye health and learning and we support the recommendation for comprehensive eye examinations for all children entering Kindergarten." "Eye See…Eye Learn aligns with our commitment to early intervention and prevention," adds Dean Younger, Early Years Consultant, "and continues to have a significant impact on our youngest learners as they embark upon a journey of life-long learning."

For more information on the Eye See…Eye Learn program, parents are encouraged to talk with their child's Junior Kindergarten Teacher, visit the Ontario Association of Optometrists' web site at www.EyeSeeEyeLearn.ca or call 1-855-424-3735.

http://www.eyeseeeyelearn.ca

Jackie Bajus, Superintendent of Education, concludes, "The Eye See…Eye Learn program is another way HWCDSB ensures that Junior Kindergarten students are provided with a strong start in realizing their full potentials."